Artists: Paula Dibb, Vicky Dolan, Alice Lenkiewicz

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Dont Like Cities But I Like New York

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Figure Drawing Classes, Sundays, 7-9

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Trial sessions available.

Contact Alice at bootleart@yahoo.co.uk for further details.

 

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10% Discount on Art Materials and Supplies from Arty Mix.

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Retrospective: Alice Lenkiewicz

RETROSPECTIVE ALICE

Retrospective

2014

The Art Gallery

78, Stanley Road, Bootle

Liverpool

L20 2AB

Biography

Alice was born in 1964, Tavistock, Devon and brought up in Plymouth. She lives in Liverpool, Merseyside.

Throughout this time she has exhibited her work in the UK and abroad.

She completed her BA (Hons) degree in Fine Art and English at Edge Hill University in 1998, continued on to a MA in Creative writing.
Alice has covered a diverse range of subject matter and developed her expertise working in a variety of different mediums. Her love of beautiful objects, historical artifacts and pattern combined with her interest in fairy-tales has allowed her to produce a rich and varied portfolio of work.

She has also curated group and solo shows for artists as well as poetry readings for guest poets.
Alice curates and runs The Art Gallery, 78, Stanley Road, Bootle, L20 2AB

This retrospective highlights a variety of Alice’s interests and themes over the years.

INSPIRATION AND WORK

My mother was Celia Norman and my father was Robert Lenkiewicz
My father often sketched me when I was a child and over the years,
I posed for some of his paintings. My mother, Mouse was a lovely mother and also very creative.

I was taught by my father to paint when I was young but during my teens I discovered my own style which tends to be inspired by a variety of styles and mediums. My work tends to fall into a variety of genres: For example:

Romantic
Pop
Figurative

Conceptual
Symbolist
Classical
Realist
Paranormal
Surrealist
Abstract
Decorative
Gothic
Urban Glamour

I have always been inspired by The Surrealists and the Dada movement.
I love using found, unwanted objects from the street to build things. I spend much time skimming pavements for found objects to use in my art. I also love the spiritual theosophical approach to art of Kandinsky and the Symbolists such as Gustave Moreau and Odilon Redon

1.Early years: Plymouth

When I was a young girl, my father introduced me to certain painters.
Robert started by teaching me to paint in a realist style. I did quite a bit of life drawing and painting my own self portrait. He also showed me paintings by many artists. We enjoyed looking at art together.
I took notice of the styles and the passion in these works.
It was important for me to learn realism. It was a challenge and I enjoyed it. I still do.

Portraits and sketching were very much part of my life and I spent a good deal of time sketching people everywhere, in the tube station and in cafes, wherever I could get a chance to sketch, I would.

I always had sketch books and diaries throughout my life. Some are from when I was a young girl and some are from college and my travels during my time in and after Plymouth.
The later diaries are when I travelled through Europe.
I always loved to write. I also wrote poems and illustrated them.
In this exhibition I have displayed many of my sketchbooks and diaries.

2.
Early eighties, Plymouth & London

When I left school at about 17, I worked in jobs as a waitress and barmaid. I met my first boyfriend at this time and we went to many parties and travelled Europe.
I was accepted onto Plymouth Art College Foundation Regional Diploma.
I can always remember one of my tutors telling me to paint fruit in the same way as Matisse, to not muddy the colours, to keep them fresh and bright.

I remember our photography teacher, John Hill who was working on some interesting punk and avant-garde themes. Once, we came into class and he had a girl, (Louise) dressed up as a mummie. She was slowly coming to life on the ‘bed’ as a piece of performance art. I found it really interesting.
I loved anything unusual and performance related.
John Hill once invited me around to his flat for a drink and I ended up getting very drunk. He photographed me naked inside a cage. I never got to see those photographs.

Plymouth was quite punk and retro at this time and a lot of people were wearing dungarees and land girl head scarves, a kind of rockabilly, land girl punk look. I used to enjoy wearing black. I enjoyed the thirties style. I collected many vintage clothes and hung them around my room. If I had kept them now, they would be relics of a by gone era. I loved collecting antique clothes, bags and jewellery.

When I moved to London, I used to love walking around Kensington Market and Camden market looking at clothes and handicrafts. I think I gathered much of my inspiration during this time. I loved the art galleries and spent much time at the Tate and The National Gallery as well as going to alternative movie cinemas to see art house films.

3. Fairy tales

Fairy tales have always been a significant influence in my work.
When I was a child, my father read many of them to me and they were quite dark tales, particularly the ones illustrated by
Gustave Doré.

Some of my works look for this similar darkness. The one image I will never forget is Red riding hood and the Wolfe by Gustave Doré.

In later years, I painted Red Riding Hood with eyes similar to a wolfe.
I wanted to create her in a hybrid way so that she was part human and part wolfe. Hybridity in figurative art interests me. Angela Carter was a huge inspiration as were many tales I read as a young girl such as Heinrich Hoffman’s 1845 bedtime classic Struwwelpeter. I loved the stories and illustrations, The Brothers Grimm and Hans Anderson. One of my favourite fairy tales was ‘The Goose Girl’. It had an impact on me as a child. It is a story about beauty, ugliness, class, betrayal and animal cruelty. It is symbolic of many things in our own society. The Pied Piper of Hamelin also fascinated me and the illustrations by Eric Winter of the ladybird book fairy tales were another big inspiration. The front cover of Sleeping Beauty was always a favourite. Those colours of mustard, black and magenta were captivating as well as the old woman and the young woman asleep.

4.
Mid Years mid eighties,
Brighton, Lewes: Surrealism

For some years, I lived in Brighton and it was here that I became involved in The Brighton arts Festival. I created many arts projects during this time. I met artists in Brighton and had my own studio in The Brighton lanes and later in Lewes. These were happy days and I enjoyed life and I was very creative and productive. I did paintings in Brighton, in shops and on walls, particularly during the time when the Berlin wall came down. We were all creating works to indicate this change in the world. I created a mural in a run down car park. I also created a large installation of a goddess for the Zap Club under Brighton Pier. I was always travelling to London and going on courses such as film and creative writing.

My travels and many visits to art galleries and museums abroad had given me a broad education of the different types of art out there.
I was incredibly inspired on my travels around the world. I went to the Pompidou center in Paris and Chagall exhibitions and the Picasso museum in Barcelona. I saw the Gaudi, Miro and the surrealists that I became very inspired by. I loved Italy. Giotto’s Scrovegni Chapel in Padua, Italy- near Venice had a profound impact on me. I was so inspired and in awe at his artworks. I have always enjoyed religious renaissance art. I also fell in love with Botticelli. On my travels, I also spent much time paying tribute to the holocaust memorials. I was very saddened by these places that held so much history of fear and brutality.

I started to experiment more with colour and found objects. When I first saw the assemblage, ‘Angel of Anarchy’ by Eileen Agar, that was it for me. I knew I could never settle to be just a realist. I was hooked on the macabre and the surreal. I loved artists such as Joseph Cornell, Marcel Duchamp, Jean Cocteau. The idea that ordinary objects could be art was always a fascination for me. I admired Cocteau’s imagination. His film ‘Beauty and the Beast’, was an inspiration.
At this time, I was watching many films by Tarkovsky and Bunuel. Silent era avant-garde surrealism was my main obsession. L’Âge d’or by Bunuel, particularly.
I began to create my own collages out of found objects and through digital media.

5.
Self Discovery, America and New Mexico.The Wilderness
Virgin of Guadalupe

I was not too keen on going to America at first.
But when I landed in new Mexico, I loved the colour and the history.
There was so much art and so much to be inspired by. It was my first real introduction to vibrant colour, kitsch, spiritualism, and the votive shrine as art all in one. I spent many a day in Santa Fe and Taos. I was soaking up the culture admiring the hand painted furniture, the unusual sculptures and fashions, the ancient traditions, the Indian mythology. I loved the beauty of the place at this time. I was very inspired and used much of the imagery in my own art. I will always remember this period as my ‘Kerouac days’, wandering from one state to another, meeting unusual people and having adventures. I travelled to many states in the US at this time

6. Marriage: Devon, Cornwall
Bookbinding Years.

While in America, I met my future husband.
We married in the UK in Devon in Yelverton.
I started doing a bookbinding apprenticeship in Cornwall.

My father was not well at the time but he asked me to help him by binding his occult collection. I spent two years in discussion with him about these books. He wrote down the books and designs he wanted.

By the time I had finished this work, I had bound at least 500 books for him. It was a fascinating time.
I spent many an hour using gold leaf and embossing the labels with hot type settings that I heated on our cooker in Cornwall. The books were very rare and beautiful. Looking back I was very fortunate to have had the opportunity to handle these books.

7.
Motherhood: The Beautiful city of Oxford: Stazia and Lucia

As much as I loved being near my father and doing the books, I missed my art. I wasn’t about to trade in my art to become a bookbinder. That would not have been me. I will never stop loving creating and being an artist.

I decided to leave Cornwall and Plymouth.
After moving here and there, from Yelverton, to Dartmoor to Cornwall to Plymouth and to Brighton and then to Oxford, I was exhausted.
I never wanted to move again but we did and many more times.

I found a job in Oxford working as a library assistant. We lived in Headington near the C.S. Lewis Nature Reserve. We rented a lovely little house. Oxford was where I had my two daughters, Stazia and Lucia.
They were born in the Radcliffe hospital. I spent many days taking Stazia’s little pushchair down to the quads in Oxford University, Christ Church Meadow and Magdalen College Deer Park. We once went into Christ Church, Oxford and were given a free tour of Alice Liddell’s life by a steward. It was a lovely time and we had access to many things. We used to love visiting the curiosities of the Pitt Rivers Museum.

I wrote a great deal in Oxford. I also exhibited my art during Oxford Visual Arts week. I was very into a kind of ‘personal writing and illustrating my work’ phase.
I wrote all about the children, drew them and wrote about motherhood, wrote poems and wrote deep into my own thoughts.

8.
Further Studies and The North
Experimental Art/Poetry
Edge Hill University

Maxine & Neon Highway
Men Hate Blondes
Writing Poetry.

I always loved to write when I was younger.
My diaries led on to more creative work.
When I was in my early thirties, I wrote a few plays and began to write poetry again.

I later moved to the North and to Ormskirk.
It was here that I studied at Edge Hill University.
I took a joint honours in Art and Design and English.
I loved this course and put much time into my studies. I later went on to study my MA in creative writing.
I set up my own poetry magazine called Neon Highway and I wrote my thesis, ‘Maxine’
With the help of my lecturer at Edge Hill University, I was introduced to many experimental poets. I published much of their work and for many years, I continued to edit the magazine along with Jane Marsh, my editorial ‘assistant’. I also embarked on organizing many poetry readings with guest poets in Liverpool.

9.
Toxteth
TAG and Curating

We eventually moved from Ormskirk. After problems with our house,particularly damp. I had to move as I was worried about Stazia who was coughing and was only a baby. We ended up in a council house in Skelmersdale for a few years. Skelmersdale was a feast for the eye in terms of found objects. We lived near to an industrial estate. I built many assemblages based upon things I found just lying on the ground and thrown into skips. The place was a haven in terms of creativity. Later, we moved to Liverpool. I was offered a house to rent in Toxteth. I brought my children up here and they went to school.

I had to find a way of making money. It was a difficult time for me and although happy, we did struggle.
Over the years, I painted and created much work. I also curated voluntarily a series of exhibitions in various venues in Liverpool. Our first exhibition took place in St Bride’s Church. We also exhibited at The Florrie and The University of Liverpool. I have always enjoyed curating and supporting other artists.

10.
The Princess Paintings

While I was bringing up my children in Liverpool, I went through some difficult times.
I started to paint beautiful faces on paper. I continued on and on. They became a kind of obsession but also a therapy and I enjoyed creating them. It was a way forward for me in terms of gaining more strength and pushing ahead after some problems. They helped me to meditate and relax. We all need things in our lives that give us some form of relaxation and an outlet for our emotions and painting ‘the maidens’ were a way in which I could quickly express my emotions and moods. If I was sad, the lady would turn out quite sad and if I was feeling strong, the lady would be strong. They were in many ways symbols of hope and happiness and a reflection of how I was feeling at the time.

11.
Decorative Art: Arts and Crafts

Klimt
William Morris
Clarice Cliff
Faberge

I have always adored the decorative arts.
My early interest in Gustav Klimt and Faberge, Japanese design, Victorian design, William Morris, Clarice Cliff, the colours, bold and graceful intricate patterns and details all fascinated me.
I used to visit the Victorian and Albert Museum and Pitt Rivers Museum. I went into many old castles, churches and museums around the world. One place in particular that inspired me was Neuschwanstein, (“New Swan-on-the-Rock castle”), the castle designed by King Ludwig of Bavaria. I also loved the churches in Prague, Poland and Lithuania. Lithuania was a beautiful country.

Over the years, I have taken part in Arts and Crafts Fairs. These were great fun. I used all my past knowledge and interest in decorative design to inspire my making of arts and crafts. Some of my works have included, hand painted mirrors, bottles, cards and plates and much more.

The Blue Lady Series is my most popular design, a series of blue female faces I draw on plates inspired by my love of the decorative, Chinese porcelain, Art Nouveau and of course, Picasso! On my travels, I saw some exhibitions on the ceramics by Picasso. The simple and beautiful faces always captivated and inspired me.

12.
Digital Art

My digital art is my latest creative venture.
I have enjoyed the way in which I can gain much imaginative scope with this medium.
It is like doing collages and photo montage the old fashioned way, except there are so many more ways in
which you can utilize the computer and change what you do to suit the concept. It is a wonderful imaginative tool. I have not only used digital media to create my own artworks but also to enhance my photography. I enjoy photography, particularly the urban city and people, windows, doors, architecture. I enjoy photographing the unusual and challenging myself on projects. Some of my photographic projects have included, Markets, Doorways, Shadows, Night life, The City at Night and Nature. I find photography and digital art fascinating.

Further works by Alice can be seen on the links below.

http://alenkiewicz.com/

https://theartstack.com/artists/alice-lenkiewicz

Exhibitions and projects Alice has exhibited in as well as curated.

PAST AND CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

Retrospective
Alice Lenkiewicz
Sep 20 – Oct 12, 2014
The Art Gallery

Liverpool Arts Fair
23 – 26 May 2014

Threshold Festival
Future Visions
2014

2014
Armada Gallery, 12, Southside Street,
Plymouth, Devon, PL1 2LA

2014
Bistro One
68, Ebrington Street, Plymouth, Pl4 9AQ
Beauty: Solo Show

2012
Art in the City
Wall to Wall Gallery, Liverpool
Princes Trust, Charity Auction

2012
Number Nine
The Gallery, Birmingham
9,Brindley Place, Birmingham, B1 2JA

2012
Cheshire Art Fair

2012
TAG Exhibition
Group show
Vice Chancellor’s Lodge

2012
TOMS
One for One
Art of Giving Tour

2012
Liverpool Biennial Independents
Toxteth Art Gallery, Love or Nothing
Group exhibition.

2012
DEBUT Contemporary
Kensington
London

2012
Parallax Art Fair, May
Chelsea Town Hall
London

2012
Up & Coming Arts presents: 21 Steps
Sat 14th April – Sat 19th May
Photographs and Painting, Alice Lenkiewicz.

2012
New Artist Fair: February
23-26 February
Candid Art Galleries, 3 Torrens Street, London EC1V 1NQ

2011
I-SHO/ I’s She’s Her’s Our’s
8th July- 23rd July
73WOMEN: Group exhibition,

2010
Liverpool Biennial Independents
Toxteth Art Gallery, Voice and Visibility
Group exhibition.

2010
Recollections
Edge Hill University
Recollections is the last exhibition showing
Liverpool Biennial Independents
Solo Show

J2010
ourney of the Bride, drawings by Alice Lenkiewicz
Blackburne House, Liverpool

2010
Liverpool Cathedral, Lady Chapel – Noble Women Exhibition
Solo Show, Paintings:Alice Lenkiewicz.
2 – 27 August: Curated by Canon Anthony Hawley.

Liverpool artwork of the week ‘Agnes Jones: Past and Future’ by
Alice Lenkiewicz in Noble Women at Liverpool Cathedral 2-27 August 2010.
Nominated by Ian and Minako Jackson.

Showcase, London, December 2009
Paintings and Objects: Alice Lenkiewicz., 3 – 31 OctCafe 1001
1 Dray Walk, Brick Lane, London, East London E1 6QL,United Kingdom October 2009

The Garage Presents, INSIDER OUTSIDER
San Diego
Ca. 92104, USA: Curated by Guy Lombardo and Larry Caveney.

2009
Gin Lane, Liverpool” :Alice Lenkiewicz
26 October – 27 November
Dot art: Solo Show: Curated by Lucy Byrne

How We Work’
A feminist art exhibition by 13 Liverpool women : Curated by Sarah Stones.
Blackburn House, Liverpool.

Continuities: Alice Lenkiewicz Solo exhibition
20 July – 14 September 2009
Lauries Centre , Wirral,

LANDFILL Art Exhibition, Maghull
5 – 11 July 2009
Private View: Saturday 4 July 2009, 17.30 “Independence Day”

Neon Highway Poetry Magazine presents CRUNCH, Poetry Performance.
Readings from The Fifth Floor.
Ideas Taking Space

Fact
19th March 09
Talk about my Art and creative process

Red Dot and Novas Arts ‘Migration’ exhibition. 12 Dec 2008
C.U.C.: Liverpool, Migration.

In an Ideal World
St Brides Church, Liverpool, Biennal Independents.
Group exhibition.

Drawn Here. Exhibition. 20 September – 12 October 2008
Arena Studios, Liverpool. Curated by Tony Smith.

The World in One City
Headspace@Eggspace
Thursday 1st May 2008. Curated by Jazamin Sinclair

Ladies Only
Liverpool Biennial:: 2002,
Creative Letts Exhibition: Blundell Street.
1991:

Solo show
Pied Cow Coffehouse, Portland, Oregan. USA.
Alice Lenkiewicz, Solo Show

1990: Maize Gallery: Berlin Wall Project. Mural Painting.
Brighton.
Brighton Pavilion, Gallery.
Bookbinders group exhibition
Curated by Jenny Gray.

Museum of Oxford
1995: Oxford Visual Arts Week.
Paintings and Drawings. Alice Lenkiewicz.
1988: Oxford Old Fire Station Arts Centre: Solo exhibition: Oil paintings,
Horizons: Alice Lenkiewicz

1988: Oxford Old Fire Station Arts Centre: Solo exhibition: Oil paintings,
Horizons: Alice Lenkiewicz

Commissions:

1990: Brighton Festival. Zap Club installation.
Commissioned by Neil Butler

2011: Edge Hill University. Paintings (Gifts)
Commissioned by Roy Bayfield.

Exhibitions and events curated by Alice Lenkiewicz

Curator
The Art Gallery
April 2011 – Present
Liverpool. , United Kingdom
Arts Organiser and Curator of TAG
April 3 2011 – to present.
Art Gallery, 78, Stanley road, Bootle, Liverpool, L20 2AB.

During this time I have organised a number of arts exhibitions and poetry events for local and national artists and writers. Much of this has been not for profit.
In the last two years I have set up my own art gallery and have provided artists further projects and exhibitions. Videos of these exhibitions can be viewed here:

 EXHIBITIONS

Further Projects

Toxteth Art Gallery
September 2008 – October 2008
Liverpool , United Kingdom
St. Brides Church
Exhibition:In an ideal World
The Toxteth Art Gallery presents local artists from Liverpool city and abroad in a mixed exhibition of various media,

Toxteth Art Gallery
September 2010 – September 2010
Liverpool , United Kingdom
Voice and Visibility
Toxteth Town Hall
Exhibition: An installation based upon memory and experience.
Artists, members of the community and Sola Arts collaborate on a project for the Toxteth Town Hall in the beautiful newly restored meeting room.
Sponsored by North West Housing Services.

The Toxteth Art Gallery
September 2012 – November 2012
Liverpool , United Kingdom
“Over the Water, Through the City, Into the Park”, 15 September – 15 November 2012
Exhibition by Toxteth artists group. View by Appointment 15 September – 15 November 2012 Open Mondays – View by appointment The Vice-Chancellor’s Lodge, University of Liverpool.

The Toxteth Art Gallery
October 2012 – October 2012
Liverpool , United Kingdom
Exhibition
Love or Nothing
Private view of Toxteth Art Gallery’s exhibition, exploring what it means to Love and lose Love, the Space and Silent Space, a personal exploration of emptiness versus fulfilment.
Opening Night: 10 October 2012, 1800 – 2100
The Florence Institute
377 Mill Street,
Toxteth,
Liverpool L8 4RF, UK
http://theflorrie.org

Neon Highway Poetry Readings

2004 A series of poetry readings, (Neon Highway) at Liverpool Central Library in the Hornby Room.
Readings have involved people published in and outside Neon Highway Magazine. The aim being to bring together local as well as guest writers from further afield. Arts Council Funded.

Neon Highway
April 2005 – April 2005
Liverpool , United Kingdom
Poetry in the City
Capital of Culture.
April 10th, 2005
The Walker Art Gallery
William Brown Street
Liverpool
Room 12

Poets from the Edge Hill Poetics Research Group will also be reading their work along with guest poet.

Neon Highway
May 2005 – May 2005
Liverpool , United Kingdom
2005 Neon Highway Reading Series, The Walker Art Gallery,Liverpool
Medieval Room
Philip Davenport with Tony Trehy and Ben Gwilliam:
Performances and Versions
A poetry event
at the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool
Saturday 13th May
2.30pm – 4.30pm

Neon Highway
April 2006 – April 2006
Liverpool , United Kingdom
Poetry Reading
Guest poet, Steve Sneyd
The Planetarium
World Museum Liverpool
Saturday 29th April
12-2pm

Neon Highway
January 2009 – January 2009
Liverpool , United Kingdom
Curated CRUNCH
A Poetry Reading
Tate Liverpool
Tate 5th Floor project: Ideas Taking Space: CRUNCH. 2009
Neon Highway Poetry Magazine presents CRUNCH
Readings from The Fifth Floor
Sunday 25 January 2009, 16.30–17.50
Performance and reading.

Poets and musicians play and read text and thoughts concerning The Wall Street Crash of 1929. Their poems will be a response to artists and their work throughout The Fifth Floor project concerning the credit crunch and present day Liverpool.

Further readings have been held in The Bluecoat sandon Room, The Masque nightclub, The 33-45 Club.

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Featured Artist: Ste Dan

Featured Artist: Ste Dan.

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Featured Artist: Ste Dan

The City

I was born not far from The Art Gallery in fact on the same road, I was always drawing and painting as a child and received my first prize for art at the age of 13 at school. But I was more interested in the moving image especially Film Noir and Italian horror movies, However, when I saw a documentary on lighting cameramen who worked on the movies, nearly all were inspired by the works of Edward Hopper, particularly Alfred Hitchcock. I eventually gained a place on a City and Guilds course for T.V. and Video production and techniques, having gained a pass, I tried to get into the industry but chose to make my own films, heavily influenced by Dario Argento, Hitchcock and David Lynch. But it was Edward Hopper that influenced me the most, I spent many years copying his work and many others such as Warhol, Rothko, Picasso and Dali. I began to do abstract works last year and my love of Mythology and Legends inspire my latest works. I have exhibited works in the past such as John Moores at the Walker art gallery and The Blue Coat in conjunction with the Liverpool biennial art show. I am self taught.

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